President's Message November 2013

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
November 6, 2013

Some have described November as the most difficult scheduling month of the year.

From the high of 14 hours 53 minutes when summer began until the 9 hours 42 minutes ending November, we have lost almost 5 daylight hours.

Yes, grass cutting is over, but leaves need raking; baseball is over, but football and basketball merge and other winter sports emerge. Halloween is over, but Thanksgiving is almost here. It’s time to remember where you put the long underwear, ‘cause on frosty November mornings, the cattle still must be fed.

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President's Message - Refocus

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
August 14, 2013

Refocus

The annual meeting of Tennessee Resource Conservation and Development Council (August 8-9, 2013, Linden, Tennessee) was successfully hosted by Buffalo-Duck RC&D.

A seminar presentation on Tennessee Economic and Community Development, University of Tennessee Extension Programs, Land Trust Options and Tennessee Department of Education goals was welcomed by attendees.

During the business session of the Board of Directors, an unexpected twist occurred. A majority of the current officers were unanimously re-elected. The message was clear - finish the job. A focus must be placed on the sustainability of individual Councils.

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Presidents Message - May 2013

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
May 3, 2013

 

As you know, the second quarter Tennessee Resource Conservation and Development meeting is held in conjunction with our Tennessee Envirothon.

We are most fortunate to have the Tennessee Department of Agriculture sponsorship again in 2013.

Many of you, as leaders of your councils, have been working with Kathy Daugherty, TN Envirothon Program Manager, for months now to prepare for this annual event.

The Executive Committee salutes Kathy for her ability to negotiate a successful funding of the program - especially during a reduced budget from the Department.

Today, the challenge of teaching the next generation of students the value of our natural resources spreads across the traditional rural population and now includes an increasing percentage of urban recruits.

Thus, the mission of Resource Conservation and Development is being thrust into the spotlight.

Are we ready to accept the challenge?